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Timothy Hampton

Professeur
University of California, Berkeley
The Politics of Babel. The Languages of Diplomacy in Early Modern Europe
01 September 2014 -
30 June 2015
Literature
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Timothy Hampton is Professor of Comparative Literature and French at the University of California, Berkeley, where he chairs the French Department and holds the Aldo Scaglione and Marie M. Burns Distinguished Professorship.  He has written widely on the relationship between literature and political discourse in the Renaissance, in both the Romance Languages and English.  Among his many articles are essays on such figures as Montaigne, Rabelais, Shakespeare, Cervantes and Bob Dylan.  He is the author of three books published by Cornell University Press:  "Fictions of Embassy:  Literature and Diplomacy in Early Modern Europe," "Literature and Nation in the Sixteenth Century:  Inventing Renaissance France,"  and "Writing from History:  The Rhetoric of Exemplarity in Renaissance Literature."  He is the director of the "Diplomacy and Culture" group at Berkeley and founder of the "Renaissance and Early Modern Studies."  He is currently working on the history of diplomatic thought, on the history of emotion, and on popular music.

Timothy Hampton is currently working on several projects relating to the broad themes of diplomacy, language, and culture that underpin my main research project at the Institut d’Etudes Avancées. These include a set of essays on diplomacy and performance (in both politics and theater), as well as essays on Renaissance humanist discussions of the colony, and on the representation of the “truce” or “cease-fire” in early modern culture.  Other projects include work on the history of emotions (specifically, on the history of “cheerfulness” and “gaiety”) and some essays on the history of jazz and popular music. In an administrative context, Timothy Hampton has been working with a group of colleagues on a project to study the future of the university and the evolution of the disciplines.  While at the Institut, he will be in active dialogue with colleagues in Paris, Copenhagen, Berlin, Munich, London, Oxford, and Cambridge.

Communication de Timothy Hampton, résident à IEA de Paris
06 Jun 2015 00:00 -
06 Jun 2015 00:00,
Paris :
Pour ceste fois : lyrique romanesque
462
2014-2015
Modern period (1492-1789)
Western Europe